Splices

Rope splices are used to splice shorter lengths of rope together to form a single, larger length of rope.  Good rope splices hold tight without impacting the natural shape of the rope.

Short Splice

A Short Splice is the easiest method to splice two ropes together.  It is a bulky knot though, and will not pass easily through blocks or pulleys.

Short Splice is the easier method to splice to ropes together

The finished Short Splice

Step 1: First, unlay the lay of both ropes for several times the rope diameter. A temporary whipping one will prevent unraveling. Marry the strands together alternating one from each end.

Short Splice construction steps

Step 2: Next Tuck F under E and G under D.

Step 3: In #3, the first two tucks are completed.

Step 4: Finally (see #4) rotate the splice 180 degrees and tuck H under C. This completes the first set of tucks. Continue tucking F,G and H over one lay and under the next. Remove the temporary whipping and tuck C, D and E over one strand and under the next . Tuck each lay three times.

A completed Short Splice

 

Eye Splice

Step 1: Count 5 rounds of the rope.

Eye Splice - count 5 rounds of rope

Step 2: Count back and unlay 5 rounds of the lay of the rope.

Unlay 5 rounds of the lay of the rope

Step 3: Fan the unlaid end of the rope and place it over the standing part of the rope. The strand to the inside of the eye must look like it is coming out from under the other two strands and the other two strands must be fanned in such a way that they do not cross each other.

Fan the unlaid strands

Step 4: While holding the inside strand in place, stick the middle strand under one of the strands of the standing end of the rope.

Stick middle strand under one of the other strands

Step 5: Pass the inside strand over the standing end strand and stick it under the next standing end strand. N0TE: The second strand goes in where the first strand came out.

Pass inside strand over the standing end strand

Step 6: Turn the splice over.

Turn the splice over

Step 7: Stick the third strand under the remaining strand of the standing end.NOTE: The third strand is stuck in where the second strand came out and comes out where the first strand went in. [NOTE] When the third strand is stuck it appears to go backward but when it is examined closely you will see that it is stuck in the same direction as the other two
strands.

Stick the third strand under the remaining strand of the standing end

Step 8: Complete the splice by working the strands snug and adding 3 to 5 50unds of tucks. NOTE: When the strands are folded back over the eye, you will notice that there is one strand going in and one strand coming out between each of the strands of the standing end.

Complete by working strands tight

 

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Back Splice (Lazy Man’s Whipping)

A Back Splice is a good splice to prevent a rope’s end from unraveling and is fairly easy to make.  It does thicken the rope though, which could make it difficult to pass through a block or pulley.

Step 1: Unlay the rope 5 or 6 turns

Back Splice - Unlay rope

Step 2 and 3: Form crown knot as shown. From above it should look like this:

Back Splice - Form crown knot

Back Splice - form Crown Knot

Step 4: Tuck one lay over the adjoining end and under itself.

Back Splice - Tuck one lay over the adjoining end

Back Splice

Step 5: Tuck the next strand over and under

Back Splice - Tuck next strand over and under

Back Splice - Tuck next strand over and under

Step 6: Tuck the remaining strand over and under.

Back Splice - Tuck remaining strand over and under

To finish the back splice continue tucking each lay over and under several times.

Back Splice - complete

 

Whippings

Sail Maker’s Whipping

Steps to construct a Sail Maker's Whipping knot

Step 1: Begin by unlaying (untwisting) the rope two inches. Make a bite in a 3-
foot length of whipping thread and place it around one of the strands.

Sail Maker's Whipping - Unlay rope

Step 2: Re-lay the rope. Wind the whipping thread tightly around the rope end for a
sufficient number of turns.

Sail Maker's Whipping - Relay rope

Step 3: Carry the bight originally formed back over the end of the same strand around which it was laid.

Sail Maker's Whipping - Carry bright back over

Step 4: Pull ends tight and tie them with a square knot between the rope ends. Trim ends of whipping thread.

Sail Maker's Whipping - Pull ends tight

 

English Whipping

English Whipping knot

Form a loop in whipping thread and lay it along the end. Wrap the whipping thread tightly around the rope. When the whipping is as wide as the rope is thick, slip the end through the loop, pull hard, and trim whipping thread.

 

Crown Knot

A Crow Knot binds the ends of the rope’s strands together with the strands coming out the bottom of the knot.  In the description below we pass the lines through the bights (loops) of its neighbor to the left but it can be reversed and passed through the bight of the neighbor to the right.

Crown Knot

Step 1: Unlay the rope.

Step 2: Bend strand 1 into a bight towards the end of the rope.

Step 3: Bend strand 2 into a similar bight with its end passing through the bight of strand 1.

Step 4: Pass strand 3 through the bight of strand 2 and work it tight.

 

Wall Knot

A Wall Knot can be used to bind the ends of the rope’s strands together.  It is similar to the Crown Knot but the strands come out the top of the knot rather than the bottom of the knot.  It also differs from the Crown Knot in that each strand passes outside of its neighbor first before going upwards through his bight (loop).

Step 1: Unlay the rope.

Step 2: Pass strand 1 outside of strand 2 but inside of strand 3.

Wall Knot Step 2

Step 3: Pass strand 2 outside of strand 3 and the end of strand 1.

Wall Knot Step 3

Step 4: Dip strand 3 outside of the bight (loop) of strand 2 and bring it up through the bight of strand 1.

Wall Knot Step 4

Step 5: Work all of the knots tight, clip off the ends, and Whipping.

Wall Knot Step 5

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