Shelters

One-Man Shelter – how to build a one-man shelter in a survival situation

One-Man Shelter A one-man shelter you can easily make using material, a tree and three poles. One pole should be about meters (15 feet) long and the other two about 3 meters (10 feet) long. To make this shelter, you should: Secure the (15-foot) pole to the tree at about…
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Shelters

One-Pole Tarp Tepee

One-Pole Parachute Tepee You need material for a canopy, stakes, a stout center pole, paracord rope, and an inner core and needle to construct this tepee. To make this tepee: Select a shelter site and scribe a circle about 4 meters (13 feet) in diameter on the ground. Attach lines…
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Shelters

Poncho Tent Shelter

Poncho Tent This tent provides a low silhouette. Unlike a poncho lean-to shelter, the Poncho Tent Shelter protects you from the elements on two sides. It has, however, less usable space and observation area than a lean-to, decreasing your reaction time to detection. To make this tent, you need a…
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Animal Food

Cleaning, cooking, and storing (preserving) wild game in a wilderness survival situation

You must know how to prepare fish and game for cooking, storage, and preservation in a survival situation. Improper cleaning or storage of wild game can result in inedible, or possibly worse, wasted fish or game.  The following explains the process of preparing and preserving the animal for cooking and how…
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Animal Food

Traps and Snares

Introduction You can typically acquire more animal food using traps that shooting – and trapping requires much less time and energy than stalking and #160; Saving time and energy lets you dedicate that saved time to foraging and or building #160; To be effective with any type of trap or…
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Water Procurement

Water Purification – dangers and how to purify water in the wilderness

Rainwater collected in clean containers or from plants is usually safe for drinking. However, water gathered from lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, or swamps should be purified, especially if the water source is near human settlements or in tropical environments.  When possible, purify all water you get from vegetation or from…
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Water Procurement

Water stills – how to build a water still to collect water in the wild

Above Ground Stills You can utilize water stills in various environments.  Even hot, arid desert habitats can yield water to a parched survivalist. Stills draw moisture from the ground or from plant material through the processes of evaporation and condensation. Various materials are required to build a still.  Some can…
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Water Procurement

Water sources – how to find water in just about any circumstance

Introduction You are in the wilderness and you need water – finding water is critical.  You can only live three days without it.  What do you do?  Almost any environment has water present to some degree.  You just have to know where to look. How to look for water First,…
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Edible Wild Plants

Yam bean

Yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus) The yam bean, commonly known as Jicama (and also known as Mexican Turnip or Mexican Potato), is a climbing plant of the bean family, with alternate, three-parted leaves and a large root. They can reach a height of a few feet given suitable support and grow…
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Edible Wild Plants

Yam

Yam (Dioscorea species) These plants are twining, tuberous vines that creep along the ground or occasionally climb trees and other structures. The woody rootstock, or tubers, is pale brown, knotty, and cylindrical in #160; Stems are reddish-brown and can grow to over 30 feet in #160; They have broad, alternate,…
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Edible Wild Plants

Wood sorrel

Wood sorrel (Oxalis species) There are over 800 species in the Oxalis #160; Wood sorrel (also known as Woodsorrels, Yellow Sorrels, or Pink Sorrels) resembles shamrock or four-leaf clover, with a bell-shaped pink, yellow, or white #160; The plants can grow up to 15 inches #160; The leaves are divided…
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Edible Wild Plants

Wild rose

Wild rose (Rosa species) The Wild Rose shrub grows 60 centimeters to meters (24 inches to 8 feet) high. Larger stems are usually densely covered with straight #160; It has alternate, sharply serrated edged leaves with 3-7 oval or slightly spear-head shaped leaflets per leaf. Its oval to pear-shaped flowers…
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Edible Wild Plants

Wild rice

Wild rice (Zizania aquatica) Wild rice (also known as Canada Rice, Indian Rice, Marsh Oats, and Water Oats) is an tall, erect, aquatic grass that typically is 1 to meters (3 to 4 feet) in height, but may reach meters (15 feet). The leaves are flat, strap-like, about 3-4 feet…
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Edible Wild Plants

Wild pistachio

Wild pistachio (Pistacia species) Wild Pistachio plants can grow as shrubs or trees up to a height of 7 meters (23 feet). It branches are spreading and form a dense #160; The bark of the Wild Pistachio is typically ashen gray in color and deeply fissured often giving the tree…
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Edible Wild Plants

Wild grape vine

Wild grape vine (Vitis species) The wild grapevine climbs with the aid of “tendrils” on stems that are hairy when young but grow into hairless vines. Its bark is #160; The tendrils that are used for support grow opposite the #160; Most grapevines produce deeply lobed leaves, alternately arranged, broad…
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